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Tips on Pilling Your Dog


Tips on Pilling Your Dog

  • Lightly covering the tablet with butter will help the pill slide down more easily. Many pills are already coated.
  • If you are right handed, hold the tablet between the thumb and index finger of your right hand. Use your left hand to open the dog's mouth.
  • Slide the thumb of your left hand into the right side of the dog's mouth, just behind the large canine tooth. With your thumb into dog's mouth, grasp the rest of the dog's upper muzzle like you would hold a baseball bat.

Tips on Pilling Your Dog

Approved youTube Video on how to pill your dog
  • Lightly covering the tablet with butter will help the pill slide down more easily. Many pills are already coated.
  • If you are right handed, hold the tablet between the thumb and index finger of your right hand. Use your left hand to open the dog's mouth.
  • Slide the thumb of your left hand into the right side of the dog's mouth, just behind the large canine tooth. With your thumb into dog's mouth, grasp the rest of the dog's upper muzzle like you would hold a baseball bat.
  • Press the thumb of your left hand into the roof of the dog's mouth and your pet will open its mouth.
  • Take the pill in your right hand and deposit it as far back in the mouth as possible. The further back in the mouth the pill is placed the easier it is to swallow.
  • Remove your hands and gently hold the dog's nose up into the air. Gently stroke the dog's lower neck to stimulate swallowing. When your dog licks its nose the pill has been swallowed.

Tips on Pilling Your Cat

Approved youTube Video on how to pill your cat
  • Lightly covering the tablet with butter will help the pill slide down more easily.
  • If you are right handed, hold the tablet between the thumb and index finger of your right hand. Use your left hand to hold the cat's head.
  • Firmly take the cat's head into your left hand as if you were picking up a baseball. Tilt the cat's nose up into the air.
  • With the tablet in your right hand, use your third finger gently to open up the cat's lower jaw.
  • Deeply place or drop the tablet into the back of the cat's mouth. If the tablet is not on the middle of the cat's tongue it will likely be spit up.
  • With your left hand still holding the cat's head, tilt the cat's nose up into the air. Gently stroke the lower neck to stimulate swallowing. When the cat licks its nose, the tablet has been swallowed.
  • A few antibiotics are available in liquid form. Ask our veterinarian if a liquid antibiotic would be easier to administer. Most medication can be crushed and mixed with a cherry elixir. Small tablets can be hidden in a Bounce brand treat.
  • Almost all medications can be mixed with our FlavorX System into twenty different flavors including chicken and tuna. Although there is an additional cost for a technician staff to pulverize the tablets and accurately calculate the proper concentration, the ease of administration can be a welcome relief.
  • Pill Pockets are a healthy treat in which medication can be hidden. We have heard our clients praise this product and have seen success with medications like prednisolone, tapazole and pepcid.

Kitten Vaccination Recommendations

Virus Name

Age to vaccinate

First Adult Vaccination

Feline Leukemia Vaccination Inoculate at 
12 and 16 weeks
Yearly vaccination recommended for all outdoor cats. Since all cats may potentially escape outdoors this vaccination should be considered for all cats.

PRCP Vaccination

Panleukopenia, Rhinotracheitis, Calcivirus, Pneumonitis

Inoculate at 8,12,16 weeks First adult vaccination recommended for all cats at 16 months. Then triennially.

Rabies Vaccination Inoculate at 
16 weeks
Vaccination recommended every one year.

Puppy Vaccination Recommendations

Name
Age to Vaccinate
First Adult Vaccination
Bordetella Vaccination Inoculate at 16 weeks Optional vaccination. Recommended for dogs that will visit kennels, hunt, attend dog shows, or live in apartments.

Vaccinate every 6-9 months if pet at risk of illness.

Cornonavirus Vaccination Inoculate at 8,12,16 weeks Booster vaccination recommended at 16 months, 28 months and then triennielly.

DHLP Vaccination
Distemper, Hepatitis,  Parainfuluenza Vaccination
Inoculate at 8,12,16 weeks Yearly vaccinations recommended at 16 months, 28 months and then triennielly. Leptospirosis administered starting with adult dogs.

Parvovirus Vaccination Inoculate at 8,12,16 weeks Yearly vaccination recommended at 16 months, 28 months and then triennielly.

Rabies Vaccination Inoculate at 16 weeks Vaccinate at 16 months and then every three years.

Adult Cat Vaccination Recommendations

Virus Name

Symptoms

Treatment & Prevention

Feline Leukemia

Transmitted in urine and saliva.

Commonly contracted through a bite wound from an infected cat. 

Many cats are contagious for years before showing signs of illness that result in death.

Suppresses the immune system and can therefore imitate many diseases. 

Commonly will see anemia, weight loss, fever, lethargy. 

Eighty percent of infected cats die within 3 years. A significant number die within 6 months of diagnosis.
No treatment available. 

A simple blood test rules out infection before vaccination. 

Annual vaccination is recommended for all outdoor cats or apartment dwelling cats. 

Since some cats may potentially escape outdoors, this vaccination should be carefully considered.

Panleukopenia

Transmission by feces, urine, and vomit.

Lack of appetite and vomiting followed by fever, dehydration, and painful abdomen.

Diarrhea occurs late in disease. 

Generally a disease of young and very old cats. Young cats can die suddenly.
Treatment with antibiotics and fluid therapy can be successful. 

Triennial vaccination is recommended for all cats.

Rabies 

Transmitted by a bite wound, usually from a wild animal.

Progressive nerve disease starting with salivation, followed by aggression and death. No treatment available.

Annual Vaccination recommended.

Upper Respiratory Viruses

Rhinotracheitis Calcivirus, Pneumonitis.

Transmitted by inhaling aerosolized particles.
Fever, severe sneezing, red mattered eyes. Drooling associated with ulcers in mouth. Some cats develop long term sneezing from chronic unresponsive infection. Intensive home treatment with special foods to maintain appetite.

Antibiotics for secondary infection and special antiviral eye ointments.

Triennial vaccination is recommended for all cats.

Our Mission:

We provide the quality care our clients expect and their pets deserve, by relying on the expertise and
compassion of each team member.

 
 
 

Contact Us

Westgate Pet Clinic
4345 France Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55410
Directions to Our Clinic
(612)925-1121
(612)925-6297 Fax
(612)568-1405 Pharmacy

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