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Toxic Plants

Many common indoor and outdoor plants have the potential to cause mild poisoning. A few plants can cause serious health risk to your pets (and young children). The Hennepin County Poison Control Center reports that about 20 percent of their pet related calls involve plants.

Know your own pet's personality. If your pet gets bored easily or likes to explore new surroundings your home may need to be thoroughly "pet proofed". Young pets put everything in their mouths so watch them very carefully.

Reports of plant toxicity in the veterinary literature are incomplete at best and sometimes misleading. A good example is the poinsettia Christmas plant. Commonly the poinsettia is thought to be highly toxic. In truth, although this plant draws the most concern from our clients, it is rare that illness can actually be attributed to this plant. The toxic part of the plant is the sap, which is very irritating to the eye and may cause some salivation if it makes contact with the mouth. Quite the contrary, all parts of mistletoe are very toxic and can cause vomiting, pain in the stomach area, and diarrhea.

Alder Buckthorn
Amaryllis
Anemone
Angel's Trumpet Tree
Arborvitae
Azalea
Baneberry
Barberry
Bird of Paradise
Bittersweet
Black Locust
Black Root
Buckeye
Buckthorn
Buttercups
Caladium
Calico Bush
California Holly
California Ivy
Castor Bean
Chinese lantern
Christmas Rose
Clematis
Cottoneaster
Creeping Charlie
Crocus
(except spring blooming)
Croton (except Codiaeum sp.)
Crown of Thorns
Crown Vetch
Cyclamen
Daphne
Delphinium
Dutchman's Pipe
Elderberry
English Ivy
Eucalyptus
Euonymus
Fluffy Ruffles
Four O'Clock
Fox Glove
Gladiola
Hawaiian Baby Wood Rose
Hedge Apples
Hogwort
Holly
Hyacinth
Hydrangea
Jack in the pulpit
Jequirity Bean
Jerusalem Cherry
Jimson Weed
Jonquil
Juniper
Lantana
Larkspur
Laurel
Lily of the Valley
Lilies, Easter
Lobelia
Loco Weed
Maiden Hair Tree
Marigold(Marsh Marigold only)
Marijuana
May Apple
Milkweed
Mistletoe
Moonseed
Monkshood
Morning Glory
Mountain Laurel
Mushrooms
Nightshade(all varieties)
Oleander
Paradise Plant
Parsnip
Partridge Breast
Peony
Periwinkle
Peyote
Poison Ash
Poison Daisy
Poison Hemlock
Poison Ivy
Poison Milkweed
Poison Nut
Poison Oak
Pokewood
Poppy (except California)
Primrose
Ranunculus Rhododendron
Rosary Beans
Rosary Peas
Sand Begonia
Scindapus
Snake Palm
Snow on the Mountain
Solomon's Seal
Star of Bethlehem
String of Beads
Stinkweed
Sumac
Toadstools
Tobacco
Trumpet Plant
Victoria Regia
Vinca (all Varieties)
Water Hemlock
Wild Parsnip
Wisteria
Yew

Mildly Toxic Plants

Many common indoor and outdoor plants have the potential to cause mild poisoning. A few plants can cause serious health risk to your pets (and young children). The Hennepin County Poison Control Center reports that about 20 percent of their pet related calls involve plants.

Know your own pet's personality. If your pet gets bored easily or likes to explore new surroundings your home may need to be thoroughly "pet proofed". Young pets put everything in their mouths so watch them very carefully.

Reports of plant toxicity in the veterinary literature are incomplete at best and sometimes misleading. A good example is the poinsettia Christmas plant. Commonly the poinsettia is thought to be highly toxic. In truth, although this plant draws the most concern from our clients, it is rare that illness can actually be attributed to this plant. The toxic part of the plant is the sap, which is very irritating to the eye and may cause some salivation if it makes contact with the mouth. Quite the contrary, all parts of mistletoe are very toxic and can cause vomiting, pain in the stomach area, and diarrhea.


Aloe Vera
Alyssum
American Ivy
Angel's Wings
Apricot (pit)
Arboricola
Arrowhead
Asparagus Fern
Avocado (seed,leaves,stem)
Birch Tree
Black Walnut
Bleeding heart
Boston Ivy
Burro Tail
Cactus
Calla Lily
Carnation
Carrot (greens)
Cattail
Century Plant
Chenille Plant
Cherries (pits)
Chrysanthemum
Clivia
Corn Plant
Daisy
Devil's Ivy
Dieffenbachia
Dogwood
Donkey Tail
Dracaena (most varieties)
Dragon Tree
Elephant's Ear
Engelman Ivy
Evergreen Plant
Fatsia
Fern
Ficus Benjamina
Fig Tree
Five Leaved Ivy
Geranium
Gladiola
Hen and Chickens
Honeysuckle
Inch Plant
Iris
Ivy
Lady Slipper
Lamb's Tail
Maple Tree
Mexican Snowball
Mother-in-law Plant
Mother-in-law Tongue
Narcissus
Nephthytis
Oak Tree
Orchid
Oxalis
Painted Lady
Pansy
Peace Lily
Peach (pit)
Philodendron
Plush Plant
Poinsettia
Polka Dot Cactus
Potato (all green parts)
Pothos
Rhubarb (leaves)
Ribbon Plant
Rose
Rubber Plant
Sansevieria
Sedum
Sensitive Fern
Shamrock Plant
Snake Plant
Spathe Flower
Spathiphyllum
Sprengeri Fern
Sweet Pea
Tomato
(entire plant except the ripe fruit)
Tulip
Umbrella Plant
Violet
Virginia Creeper
Weeping Fig
Weeping Willow
Woodbine

Non-Toxic Plants

Many common indoor and outdoor plants have the potential to cause mild poisoning. A few plants can cause serious health risk to your pets (and young children). The Hennepin County Poison Control Center reports that about 20 percent of their pet related calls involve plants.

Know your own pet's personality. If your pet gets bored easily or likes to explore new surroundings your home may need to be thoroughly "pet proofed". Young pets put everything in their mouths so watch them very carefully.

Reports of plant toxicity in the veterinary literature are incomplete at best and sometimes misleading. A good example is the poinsettia Christmas plant. Commonly the poinsettia is thought to be highly toxic. In truth, although this plant draws the most concern from our clients, it is rare that illness can actually be attributed to this plant. The toxic part of the plant is the sap, which is very irritating to the eye and may cause some salivation if it makes contact with the mouth. Quite the contrary, all parts of mistletoe are very toxic and can cause vomiting, pain in the stomach area, and diarrhea.

Abelia
African Daisy
African Violet
Aglaonema
Airplane Plant
Alpine Current
Aluminum Plant
Anthuricum
Anthurium
Aralia
Araucaria
Areca Palm
Ash Tree
Asidistra
Aster
Baby's Breath
Baby's Tears
Baby's Toes
Bachelor Buttons
Basket Vine
Begonia
(except Sand Begonia)
Birdsnest Fern
Bleeding Heart Vine
Blood Leaf Plant
Bonsai
Boston Fern
Bougainvillea
Bromelia
Bromeliad
Butterfly Orchid
Button Fern
Calathea Argyraea
Calico Hearts
Calla Lily Begonia
Camellia
Carrion Flower
Cattleya
China Doll
Chinese Evergreen
Christmas Cactus
Christmas Evergreen
Coelogyne
Coleus
Columbine
Cordyline
Corn (except Corn Plant)
Creeping Charlie
(house plant)(see toxic plants)
Crocus (spring blooming only)
Croton (Codiaeum sp.Dahlia)
Dandelion
Elm Tree
Emerald Ripple
Eugenia
False Solomon's Seal
Feltbush Plant
Fittonia
Forsythia
Friendship Plant
Fuchsia
Gloxinia
Golddust Plant
Goldfish Plant
Grape Ivy
Hawaiian Ti Plant
Hibiscus
Honey Locust
Hosta
Hoya
Impatiens
Jacob's Ladder
Jade Plant
Japanese Aralia
Japanese Lantern
Kalanchoe
Kentia Palm
Lilac
Lindea Tree
Lipstick Plant
Maidenhair Fern
Magnolia Bush
Marigold
(except Marsh Marigold)
Maternity Plant
Mock Orange
Mountain Ash
Natal Plum
Neanthe Bella
Nerve Plant
Norfolk Island Pine
Palm
Panda Plant
Passion Vine
Peacock Fern
Peacock Plant
Pepperomia
Petunia
Phlox
Piggyback Plant
Pilea
Pine Tree
Plush Plant
Polka Dot Plant
Potentilla
Powder Puff
Prayer Plant
Pregnant Plant
Propeller Plant
Purple Passion
Pyrocantha
Queen's Tears
Rabbit's Foot
Rainbow Plant
Rosary Vine
Rubber Plant
Salvia
Schefflera
Screwpine
Seersucker Plant
Sensitive Plant
Silk Tree
Silver Dollar Plant
Silver Evergreen
Silver Poplar
Sinningia
Snapdragon
Spider Plant
Spirea
Staghorn Fern
Staghorn Sumac
Starfish Flower
String of Buttons
Striped Inch Plant
Sweat Plant
Swedish Ivy
Sword Fern
Teddy Bear Plant
Umbrella Tree
Velvet Plant
Venus Fly Trap
Viburnum
Vriesea
Wandering Jew
Wax Plant
Wild Onion
Yucca
Zebra Basket Vine
Zebra Plant
Zinnia, Creeping

Pain Management

Pain management in companion animals has changed greatly over the last 10 years. Pain in our pets is now thought to be
similar to the pain that people feel instead of a previously perceived tolerance to pain. Managing pain in our pets is important for a variety of reasons. Pain not only impacts an animal's quality of life, but it slows healing, contributes to the development of illness and has been proven to shorten the lifespan of an animal. Much research has gone into identifying what causes pain in animals, the physiology of the development of pain and the different modalities for interrupting the pain process.

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There are many aspects to managing pain in our pets. Most pain management involves the use of pharmaceuticals, but lifestyle changes, such as weight loss, neutraceuticals, and physical therapy can also lessen and shorten the pain that our pets experience.

Using a variety of medications with different actions affecting different steps in the development of pain creates a more effective treatment for pain. This is called multi-modal pain management. Whether blocking pain before it starts or managing pain once it is present, more than one class of medication is often used to achieve the best outcome. The most commonly used classes of pain medications are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, corticosteroids, and topical and local anesthetics. Anti-anxiety medications, antidepressants, sedatives, and muscle relaxants also play an important role in pain management because anxiety and tension can enhance pain.

The most effective way to manage pain is to block it before it starts. This is not always possible, but when the onset of pain can be predicted, as with elective surgeries and procedures including sterilization (spay/neuter), declawing cats, removing masses, or performing dental cleanings, the pain associated with the procedure can be greatly lessened by giving medications before any pain or inflammation exists. Administration of medication before, during and after a procedure provides the most adequate pain management.

If pain is already present, there are many classes of medications to help block or relieve the pain and keep it from progressing. Common causes of unpredictable pain are orthopedic disease (osteoarthritis, torn ligaments, spinal trauma or broken bones), organ inflammation (kidney, liver, pancreas, muscle or skin), and cancer. Recent research has shown that medications such as amantadine and gabapentin, which work on the way pain is processed by the nervous system, can help with chronic pain in dogs.

Non-pharmaceutical compounds, neutraceuticals, have been used in recent years for joint health in animals. The common combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate helps to nourish joint cartilage and reduce inflammation associated with aging or joint disease. An injectable neutraceutical, polysulfated glucosaminoglycan (PSGAG) has also shown effectiveness in the management of joint inflammation.

Regardless of the cause, type or duration of pain, an uncomfortable pet is an unhappy pet. Pain decreases the quality and length of an animal's life. At Westgate Pet Clinic, we strive to keep all of our patients free of pain and would be happy to discuss your pet's condition with you.

Our Mission:

We provide the quality care our clients expect and their pets deserve, by relying on the expertise and
compassion of each team member.

 
 
 

Contact Us

Westgate Pet Clinic
4345 France Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55410
Directions to Our Clinic
(612)925-1121
(612)925-6297 Fax
(612)568-1405 Pharmacy

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